Tuesday, 3 November 2015

Two Tired Carrots and the 3rd £1 saver idea

Yesterday was another foggy day not quite as dense as Sunday and it even brightened up for a while early afternoon.
Col was out in the loo block turning off the water, draining the system and covering the basins and cisterns  with dust sheets to keep out the spiders and flies. The mats are laid up against the bottom of the doors to try to stop the leaves blowing in, but I bet when everything is opened up again in the spring there will be leaves and cobwebs everywhere. Dustbins and picnic tables are stored in the recreation room.  I had a big clean up indoors and chopped some more kindling.

I enjoyed  the Hugh FW programme about waste. I'm pleased to say we are NOT one of the millions who waste food like those featured on the programme! I'm guessing that most of the bloggy friends who read this don't waste much either.
There is only one more in the series so I'm not sure if Hugh can do anything to carry on this campaign. I hope so because all that waste is just criminal.

As I said not much gets wasted here. Since our youngest moved out I've had 9 years of cooking for 2 people, I know how much to prepare and we rarely have left overs after meals but sometimes things get left in the fridge a bit too long.
This is what I do with 2 tired carrots.

But before that I'll ask - how do you store your shop bought carrots? . If they are in a plastic bag, and the value ones usually are, I take them out of the bag and lay them on an old clean tea-towel in the salad drawer of the fridge. Then I cover with another clean tea towel. They are then dark, cool and dry and keep well for 3 or 4 weeks.

Anyway, when they get really ancient - Top, tail, wash and peel off any manky bits, grate the rest into a saucepan. Add one finely chopped onion, a vegetable stock cube and a little water to just cover the veg. Bring to the boil, turn down heat, put lid on and simmer gently until carrots and onions are soft, adding a little more hot water if needed. When they are soft stir in 2 tablespoons flour, add 1 tin of cheapest tomatoes and whizz the whole lot up in a liquidiser or whichever machine you have for whizzing. Add more water to thin it down then heat it up and enjoy a delicious bowl of tomato soup. This amount would make 4 bowls.

When I first began blogging someone( can't remember who) had a Food Waste Friday when they would take a picture of the food that had been chucked out for whatever reason. They reduced their food waste a lot over the months. Perhaps we should start this again?


The third Save a £1 tip from April 2013 was - Don't start pets on expensive food.
There is now a problem with this tip because as far as I can see there is now no such thing as cheap pet food!


No Spend/ Low spend November challenge - Yesterdays spending = Nothing

Back Tomorrow
Sue

47 comments:

  1. I enjoyed Hugh's program last night, with all the publicity over the past few years on people throwing away perfectly good food every week i am still surprised that people still do this, I put it down to laziness, it was so sad what happened to that farming family, on the news this morning they were saying wonky food is making a come back in supermarkets, too late for them unfortunatly.

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    1. There are very few family farms left around here either.
      I'd love to go fishing through bins to see what people threw out!

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  2. Yes it was an interesting programme - shocking amount of waste! Mr D was VERY upset at all those parsnips rotting away as he loves them! I had two sad looking parsnips in the fridge yesterday similar to your carrots - I added them to my butternut and chickpea curry, but next time I might try your recipe out. I do love a bowl of soup :)

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    1. I love parsnips roasted and the ones they were chucking look better than our crop this year

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  3. Soup is so simple, nutritious and cheap. Its the ideal solution to sad looking vegetables. Or as Happeninguponhappiness says curried vegetables. Yum! I'm hoping to catch up on the program on my weekend off. HFW is a hero of mine ;0). I've loved his River Cottage series with all his special guests, jam makers, foragers and chicken keepers.

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    1. I hope Hugh can keep this campaign going

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  4. You're right about pet food. The sardines in our local supermarket are cheaper in the human aisle than in the pet food aisle!

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    1. We had a 5 year gap between pets and the price has increased a lot in that time

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  5. Little food waste here :). I shall watch HFW's programme on catch up later, not having had chance last night.

    Simplybeingmum blogs about FoodwatseFriday and takes pics of her fridge and waste every week

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    1. Thank you for that info I shall have a look

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    1. The amount chucked by some people is just dreadful

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  7. I thought the programme was really good, I only hope it has opened some folks eyes. As you say lots of us would no more throw away a wonky parsnip than leave the front door open with the central heating on!! We are mostly the converted ... if indeed we were ever the wasteful.

    The perfectly good items that he returned to the street and ended up giving away just shows what perfectly good items are thrown away into landfill each and every week. If only charities could have a representative at rubbish tips to claim the good items for use by their customers a lot of that could be avoided.

    The sooner supermarkets start accepting wonky and less than perfect items from their producers the better. And they should also stop tying farmers in to their contracts, and not allowing them to sell the less than acceptable food via other means, which is why the farmers in the programme had to simply throw away the rejected parsnips.

    How do I store my supermarket bought carrots, well I simply remove them from the plastic bag they came in lay them on a double piece of paper towel and then slide them back into the bag (or into a Stayfresh bag from Lakeland), put a peg around the top and put them in the salad drawer of the fridge.

    Alternatively I make up a big batch of Veg Hash and freeze in usuable portions. This is then the base for all our stews, casseroles, soups, tomato sauces etc. (veg hash = whizzed up in the food processor until finely chopped carrot, celery and onion).

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  8. When we had chickens, nothing went to waste because leftovers, peelings, etc. went to them. They produced amazing big eggs with dark yellow yolks. Now if I have salad greens that go slimy before we can use them, they get composted, so at least they become something valuable later on. -Jenn

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    1. Because we sold eggs we weren't allowed to feed kitchen waste to our hens, but they had garden waste. We compost too

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  9. Someone gave me potatoes and vegetables from their garden surplus recently and was shocked that I stored them in the salad trays of the fridge. I asked where he thought I should store them and he replied "Somewhere cold and dark". I laughed and pointed out that the fridge was cold and dark! The carrots are better stored on kitchen paper as they are quite moist.

    I was shocked at the Hugh FW programme. We never throw food out and recycle everything we can. No wonder so many folk are in debt if they're chucking away so much. If people would just take the time to look in the fridge to see what needs using up first and make a meal from that, it would save a lot of waste. Anything soggy can be turned into soup or sauces and frozen in portions. I've noticed that children are getting really fussy and worried about eating items past their sell by date. If it looks, smells and tastes fine, then it it fine!

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    1. I use a tea towel in the salad drawer because it can be washed whereas kitchen roll has to be chucked out
      I could certainly make meals with the things that were being chucked out on the programme

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  10. Pet food is expensive but some is more expensive than others. When we got Archie, the breeder gave us a sample of Eukanuba. I think food makers target breeders and ask them to give samples of their food when they sell a puppy. Needless to say, once we saw the price of Eukanuba, we didn't bother with it. I missed the programme about waste, I'll have to see if I can catch it anywhere.

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    1. One of our dogs requires a grain free diet which is expensive. I buy it online from Bitiba or Zooplus as they are cheaper than elsewhere. They sell lots of brands.

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  11. Love your soup recipe and will definitely try this. I store my carrots in a cloth drawstring veg bag bought from Lakeland sale cheaply where they keep fresh for several weeks hung up at the top of our cellar. All that waste was shameful on last night's programme!

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    1. In the States lots of people have Root Cellars for storing veg. I quite like the idea of a cellar for food storage

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  12. I chop up my carrots and store in portions in the freezer.
    xx

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  13. living on my own makes it tricky not to waste stuff. At least my impulse buys are mainly tins, like those anchovies (!!!) I bought the other week

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  14. Where I worked we supplied salads and deli salads to a leading supermarket, any extras at the end of a run were sold in the staff shop or swapped with one of our sister factories. for ready meals or cakes. We were not allowed to give it away as it could have effected sales at the shops! Our waste was monitored closely, everything from food to plastic to water. We recycled all food waste for compost, plastics, paper and card were compressed into bales and sold, all soft wood pallets were also recycled.

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    1. That company must be one of the good ones

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  15. I keep the carrots in the fridge, if there bendy I still use them, we are quite good with waste. I have just watched Hugh on iplayer, it was shocking.I can't believe how much people are throwing away.

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    1. I hope hugh keeps badgering the supermarkets

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  16. Variation on tom soup recipe, add a chilli and some red lentils.
    Like you, I use tea towels or a cotton bag. Kitchen roll is yet more waste.
    If any fruit or veg were to get beyond the pale, there is always the chickens or the compost.
    Cooked food is often fed to the cats and dogs. If you read the list of ingredients in your pets food you will find that there is very little meat or fish in it the rest is made up with rice and veg. Our vet tells us that they are in very good condition.
    As for campaigning, well it is all up to us isn't it? We choose what we buy and where we buy it. How much we buy and what we do with it. Yes it is good that people like Hugh and others can get the ball rolling on a national scale but it is down to us.

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    1. Sadly I cant eat lentils or pulses but do chuck a pepper in when I have them

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  17. That's a brilliant carrot-keeping tip, I will try that. In the bag they go soft and wet, and out of it they simply dry out and go pale and uninteresting!
    Margaret P

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  18. We watched last night and your right we are nothing like the wasteful people we saw, like you we ensure we don't buy more food than we can use, therefore stopping waste even getting in our house. It was terrible to see the items people threw in their bins, we recycle almost everything. If I have to throw any clothes away, I look to see if the material can be reused, if not I keep buttons and zips.

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    1. I can't ever imagine throwing away a whole loaf of unopened bread - there are so many uses for bread , dried crumbs, toast, croutons and just good old bread and butter pudding

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  19. I do agree Sue that the amount of food wasted is horrific. Particularly when so much of the world goes hungry.
    Interesting how you store carrots. I always line the salad drawer in my fridge with a double layer of kitchen paper. I always remove carrots and parsnips from their bags because otherwise they sweat and go bad much more quickly. I find that laid in the salad drawer with the lid on (a dark glass in my case) they keep quite well. Any left at the end of the week is made into what my friend calls 'fridge-bottom soup'.

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    1. I used to use kitchen roll then thought tea towels were better as they could be washed

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  20. There's not much we waste here. I menu plan and buy what we need and I'm pretty good on portions as well. I even know how many roast potatoes we all eat! But I haven't always been good especially when I was younger and worked full time. I used to just throw anything and everything into the trolley, cram it into the fridge, and then throw a fair bit of it in the bin at the end of the week. Disgraceful when I look back. I don't take carrots or any veg out of their bags but I do rip a massive hole in them so they can 'breathe'. I'm not sure why I do this, maybe somebody told me to but it seems to work. xx

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    1. Yes they do get very wet inside the bags without letting the air in

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  21. I store my carrots in my kids tummies. We had 2 tired specimens lurking in the salad drawer when we came home from our week at yours: they went in the fridge soup and got properly told off by a certain little girl, "mean mummy, where are my carrots?"

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    1. Ah you found a way to comment, now you could start a blog for all that spare time you have!! :-)

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  22. Gotta say one thing that never goes to waste is carrots. The horse and donkey usually get them before I do, and they are always on my shopping list..!

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    1. Goats were handy for any spare carrots,apples, leaves off caulis etc....miss my goats

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    2. Our dogs eat carrot ends, apples, cauli leaves etc.

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  23. I store my root veg in Stayfresh bags (bought from Lakeland many years ago, I wash and re-use them).
    I was amazed that so many seemingly intelligent people were so wasteful with food.
    I can't see the idea for distributing unused cooked chicken to charities being a success. Not many charities have the means to store this and chicken is notoriously difficult to re-heat.

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    1. Yes we wondered about that chicken - would they have to eat it cold?

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