Friday, 15 January 2016

Time to get packing and frugal Friday

I did have to turn out yesterday in the dark, cold, windy, sleety night to drive back to Ipswich to pick Col up again - The things you have to do for husbands! :-)   As he was able to have the bed quite early in the day they were able to do the first treatment yesterday rather than today. He has lots of leaflets, more tablets and dire warnings about what do if feeling ill. On the plus side  he found the food on Somersham ward (the oncology ward) is completely different to the rest of the hospital, they have huge meals and, when he is in for a couple of nights for the alternate treatments, he'll even get fried breakfasts!

The removal company dropped in a load of boxes yesterday so I can really get packing now. We already had a dozen or so medium sized boxes here which I've filled with things that can be put into storage in the shed. I can also start packing boxes of books. I've gone off the idea of taking the old  dark stained wood shelves with us so the books can stay in boxes until we get the living room carpet changed and then get some new shelving. By which time we will know how Col is and what we will do next.


 And finally, what  frugal things can I remember from this week ...............

Made 4 portions soup from the outside bits of a head of celery, a couple of carrots, half an onion and a tin of tomatoes

Found some unused 1st class stamps in my old stamp album when I was packing it away so have put them in the drawer to use them this year.

Ate homegrown beetroot, parsley, brussels sprouts, leeks and apples.

Made 3 loaves bread which work out at less than 38p loaf.

Free heat all week.

Took a flask and a snack to hospital to save having to buy at the cafe.

Cleared a blockage in the drains ourselves.

That's about it for today ,thanks for comments yesterday.

Back Tomorrow
Sue











35 comments:

  1. Good luck with the packing. It took me nearly a week to pack my kitchen so very please that was the first room I started with!

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    1. I've got rid of so much stuff at the 3 car boot sales and to charity shops that the packing ought to be easy, but it's so many years since we've moved I've conveniently forgotten how much hard work it is

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  2. Hope the packing goes well - good luck!
    Liz

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  3. Glad to hear the food on the ward is good, it does make a difference.

    It feels very real when you start packing up boxes! I'm sure you will be coming across all sorts of interesting things :)

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  4. Good luck with it all
    Julie xxxxxx

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  5. So much free stuff I could do I reckon! Luckily my heating is free, in the sense of my boiler not working

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    1. Oh no, how horrible, and it's turned so cold

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  6. Good luck with the boxes. From my vast moving experiences I would recommend remember to write in big bold words what is inside before you tape up (five minutes later you will have doubts); use good duct tape as the cheap stuff does not last if you have to leave stuff in boxes longer than 6 months; try not to mix things or you will forever wonder why the spare teapot was in with a box of socks. Plan how to get rid of the boxes if the movers don't want them back, ours didn't last time and 3 months later went round the village begging anyone with a for sale board to take them away rather than take them to be recycled!

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    1. Our removal men do want the boxes back which will be difficult as we plan to store lots unopened in a shed

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  7. Pleased to hear Col has started treatment, it must be a scary time for the two of you, packing will help to occupy you a bit and keep your mind off things I hope :-)

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    1. So sorry to read about another of your alpacas dying, very sad news.

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  8. good luck with the packing, i do hate packing, all the best sammie x

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    1. Before we came here 23 years ago we packed and unpacked and moved 6 times in 13 years but I've now forgotten all the hassles!

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  9. Hoping that Col will not feel too unwell with his treatment.
    Good luck with the packing and all the preparations for your move.

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    1. chemo seems to affect people in different ways so we will see what happens and as they say - one day at a time!

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  10. Good luck with everything that you are doing just now. Catriona

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  11. Fingers crossed that Col can cope well with the treatment. That looks like an awful lot of boxes, but don't overdo it packing like it's going to happen tomorrow.

    That soup sounds very thrifty indeed. I must get back to baking bread again when I'm back from visiting my best friend in So'ton, though I think the bread maker is possibly on the blink (I shan't mourn it too deeply).

    It must feel like the move is definitely going to happen now.

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  12. Good luck with everything if you are busy it will help take your mind of things for a bit x

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  13. Good luck with everything Sue.
    I hope Col feels OK during his treatment.
    In a way it is good that you have the move to occupy your thoughts and time. Good advice to label the boxes.
    I am ashamed to say that I still have a couple of boxes unopened from when I emigrated from the UK in 1990! I know there are treasures in there and I did label them, so they are kind of a secret stash of yesteryear. I think it will be like opening a time capsule when I finally do open them.
    Pam in TX.xx

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  14. Things are starting to move now. Hope your move goes OK and all the best to Col as he has his treatment.
    xx

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  15. From your post yesterday, i wanted to comment, I've had 4 bone marrow biopsies. they can be quite painful unless under conscious sedation .
    I am a long term blood cancer survivor. i'm wondering what type of cancer does Col have.? Also, I went thru a stem cell transplant after my induction.
    Some chemotherapies are more tolerable than others. But be sure you always get anti nausea meds and take before treatment so as to ward off nausea. If I can offer any insight let me know. Best regards to you and Col and a successful treatment plan for him. Its always very shocking to go thru this and it can feel very lonely.

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    1. He has Mantle cell cancer, one of the High Grade Non Hodgkin Lymphomas. Quite unusual in someone aged under 60. he will have 2 types of chemo, a short one in outpatients alternating every 3 weeks with a stay in hospital for 2 nights for the harsher treatment. Then stem cell at the end.

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  16. Keep packing! Hope that all keeps well. xx

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  17. May heart goes out to your husband (and all with cancer). May the grace of your God be with him throughout the chemo treatment.

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    1. My heart goes out to your husband (and all with cancer). May the grace of your God be with him throughout the chemo treatment.

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  18. Happy Packing to you! I'm sure you already have a very organised method sorted out :O)
    Best wishes to Col.
    xx

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  19. Good luck with the packing, I bet those boxes will be full to bursting despite getting rid of so much!
    Good to hear Col's treatment was able to get underway.
    Lisa x

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  20. So glad the Colin wasn't starved of food on the oncology ward. I used to visit an oncology day ward, which was a lovely, cheerful place, and when it was lunch time a trolley came around with food not only for the patients, but also those with them who wanted a cup of tea, coffee or glass of fruit juice and a sandwich or cake or piece of fruit. They were all so kind and caring, and yet the ward was like a sitting room albeit for the drugs stands and people linked up to them with cannulas attached to their hands or elsewhere. Best of luck to you both.
    Margaret P

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  21. Ps I meant to say that your frugality in taking a flask and a snack to hospital was what most people would've done a few decades ago. We never considered buying food while we were out, we always took our own. Ditto we never bought hand wipes, I always too a damp face flannel in a polythene bag when our boys were little. There are so many things now that we didn't have but we managed! Using up leftovers was normal, as was using up all the old veg for soup, so dear girl, yes, you are saving money but this needn't be termed "frugality" - to me it is simply normal behaviour having been a child in the 1950s when all goods were scarce. We wrapped sandwiches in the waxed paper in which the bread was sold (now in plastic bags which are thrown away) and we always took a flask of coffee with us when we went out. In fact, we have started to do this again, fed up with the cost of coffee and a scone for two, and having very little change from a ten pound note for them.
    Margaret P

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  22. I think it'd take me too long to pack as I'd be remeniscing over every single little thing I put in the boxes!

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