Monday, 22 August 2016

English?

Why have so many words had 'ized' added to the end?
So casual workers are now casualized workers.....really?

And when did "gonna" become part of the language .......it's "Going to" "GOING TO"!

Feel better now :-)

Back Soon
Sue

40 comments:

  1. So glad to hear Jacob is home and feeding better after his op. It's a worrying time for all concerned. Amy gets ribbed a lot for her 'posh' accent. We come from Manchester, how can that be posh? but she says it's because she pronounces her words properly, so you'll be pleased to hear she would definitely say 'going to'. Personally I can't abide 'innit'. I expect if I thought about it there'd be a lot more words on my list. xx

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    1. Oh dear, in Suffolk we say "int it" quite a lot!

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    2. As a ex English teacher I have had many disputes with students about 'abit' and 'alot' being two words, their argument was always the same "well,I was never told a lot was two words before". I suspect they had but chose to ignore it.

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  2. .....and let's not start on the misuse of apostrophes, shall we???? I am known to be pedantic about language and I'm proud of it! Catriona

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    1. I still have problems with apostrophes

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  3. My particular bĂȘte-noire is 'gotten'. When did that become part of standard English usage? It seems to pop up on many English blogs incredibly frequently these days. It's American-English not English-English.

    I can also get very annoyed by people who seem unaware of the difference between 'there' and 'their'. And, finally, drawers are spelt 'drawers' not 'draws.' And, breathe!!

    Really pleased to hear your grandson is getting better. Elizabeth.

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    1. Yep I'm with you on 'gotten' not nice and I reckon its predictive text that causes a lot of problems on their and there

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    2. The word gotten is the past participle of get and dates back to Middle English. It is not a modern slang word, it has simply fallen from favour in Britain, but due to it's popularity in North America is now considered by many to be slang, or bad grammar.

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  4. I hate cops and kids, horrible words.

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    1. I rarely say kids for children because we kept goats for 20 years and goats have kids!

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  5. You've opened a can of worms now! One of my pet peeves is the use of seen, as in 'I seen it'. When I hear that it's like nails on a blackboard. When I came to Canada in the late 60's people would always comment on the fact that I enunciated my words, such as sound ing the 'g' at the end of coming, going, having etc. Must have been my 'posh' Manchester upbringing!!!!!

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  6. Dont get me started. This is America -z -ation.

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  7. What about this one...

    "gotten"

    Really? This is a word!!!

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    1. Yes, it is and it dates back to Middle English.

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    2. Yes, I read once, as Deborah RusticPumpkin has mentioned, that it dates back to Middle English, ugly-sounding though it is.
      Margaret P

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  8. I'm from Yorkshire, but have never spoken with a Yorkshire accent. I don't know why and never thought about it until my mum mentioned it.
    I too like English to be spoken properly and I think people have become lazy in the way they talk. I have lots of pet hates that I see and you can call me old fashioned if you like, but I hate to see "phone". I always put an apostrophe before the "p" when writing it to indicate that there is a part of it missing ie telephone. The same with 'fridge (refridgerator). I always remember a very good English teacher I had telling the class not to forget to sound the "g" in recognise as a lot of people pronounce it reconise. When did medicine become medcine?

    Joan (Wales)

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    1. Oh dear me, Joan, and what about secretary pronounced sec-it-ry!
      Margaret P

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  9. People who say/write 'he could of' instead of 'he could have' ...irk me! Also, 'congradulations' - there's a T In there, people! To, too and two and there and their. We're, were and where! My list goes on and on!

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  10. Pacific instead of specific. Aargh!

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  11. Your post brought a smile to my face. You perked my interest so I looked up "gotten" and found that it is the -ed participle of "get" in American English not British English. If you find I use word, please forgive me as I'm American. Take care dear friend, Pat :)

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  12. "Could of" gets me going , but then so does "less" when it should be "fewer". Also, the many variations in spelling "their, there and they're" which inevitably are used wrongly. Oh, and don't get me started on the wandering apostrophe... I think I'm just a pedant!

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  13. my English is not the best in the world but I do get annoyed with spell checkers that want to change words to azion and ized it an American thing.

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  14. So listening to interviews on the radio, why do so many people start their sentences with so?

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  15. I am with everyone on the correct use of words and their spelling, however, I can't help wondering what Shakespeare would make of the English language as it is used today. Truthfully, I believe he would have marvelled in the diversity. English as it is spoken today would be completely unrecognisable to Chaucer, and I wonder how many have fought against the constant changes to our language over the centuries? Language is constantly evolving with new words and new spellings. It is interesting and brings diversity to life.
    While it made me cringe to hear Matt Baker say that someone had 'medalled' during the Olympics, medalled is now, apparently, a recognised word.
    Twenty years ago, who among us would ever have thought that, not only would Google be a verb, but something many of us do every day. It's all change, not always for the better, but it happens.
    ~~~Deb xo

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  16. The one that gets me is why so many people say 'anythink' and 'everythink' ...please people, thing has a G on the end not a K.



    This is getting more widespread.

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  17. Glad your boys - big and little - are on the mend.
    Hadn't looked on here for a few days, so was shocked to hear about little one. Yes, I remember that it's usually a boy thing. At least it's something that is easily fixed by surgery.
    Like S, I had missed the library book pictures, so, it's good to see some.
    I am back to doing a bit of embroidery (been off it for ages), so thought a "talking book" would be a good accompaniment. So, I went on the library website and reserved a Trollope. It's ready for collection today!
    I'm at last reading the Elly Griffiths Woman in Blue - had to wait a very long time for that one, and in fact am the first borrower of a brand new paperback. Enjoying it so far.

    I know what you mean Sue about energy levels as you get older. Oh to be able to do all the things we did even ten years ago!

    Re grammar/spelling - my bugbear is people who write 'defiantly' when they mean definitely!

    Take care! xx

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  18. Absolutely seems to have replaced "yes" and why is everybody and everything "amazing"? It annoys me.

    Joan (Wales)

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  19. Can we talk about these new endings for words? The latest offender is - 'ality'. Musicality does that mean rythym? And functionality. What happened to the word function?

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  20. Glad you got that off your chest Sue!

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  21. It drives me mad all this misuse of the English language. Their, there and they're being the ones that irk me the most. Don't they actually teach proper English at school anymore? We had handwriting lessons in our last year of junior school to learn 'joined-up writing' and we had to write lists of there/their write/right etc etc so it was drummed into us.

    And as for apostrophes ... aaarrrggghhh

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  22. Politicians seem to say 'gonna' instead of 'going to'. They must think it's trendy.
    xx

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  23. Oh, Sue, don't get me started: I detest glottal stops for a start, it must be harder to break a word than to pronounce it correctly ... or, as some would say, kerrek-ly.
    Next, I dislike the turning of nouns into verbs, i.e. some of our Olympic athletes were "medalled".
    And people should be made aware that "your" isn't anything to do with the contraction of "you are", that is "you're".
    Children should also be taught about apostrophes just as much as they are taught the alphabet, they're just as important, ditto punctuation. Punctuation marks aren't just marks on the page sent to annoy us! They lend meaning to the written word.
    I will leave it there, others are bound to have other examples of things that annoy!
    All good wishes,
    Margaret P

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  24. PS Oh, and what about "dove" for the past tense of "dive" as in "He dove into the water" .. Didn't we used to say, "He dived into the water"?
    Margaret P

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    1. Or when instead of dragged they say drugged. I thought that was when you got high

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  25. Mine is "Brung" instead of brought!

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  26. Mine is "Brung" instead of brought!

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  27. nowadays English is the #1 language around the world! follow http://royalediting.com/grammar-in-our-life-necessity-or-extravagance and read about grammar and its role in your life!

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