Saturday, 21 May 2016

We go down to the sea again, the lonely sea and the sky

Yesterday with Col still waiting to go for the 6th chemo cycle and the weather not too bad we packed some lunch and nipped down to the beach hut.
It was deserted, except for dog walkers and walkers without dogs
Took my big camera and zoomed in on this big ol' gull

The windbreak is ours - not a soul in sight at any of the other huts( except a man doing repairs down the end)

 Sailors going into the sailing club on the River Deben

The sandbank is Felixstowe side of the Deben and the trees in the distance are Bawdsey on the other side of the river Bawdsey is famous for being the birthplace of Radar during WWII
The post title comes with apologies to John Masefield!



Sea Fever
I must go down to the seas again, to the lonely sea and the sky,
And all I ask is a tall ship and a star to steer her by,
And the wheel's kick and the wind's song and the white sail's shaking,
And a grey mist on the sea's face, and a grey dawn breaking.

I must go down to the seas again, for the call of the running tide
Is a wild call and a clear call that may not be denied;
And all I ask is a windy day with the white clouds flying,
And the flung spray and the blown spume, and the sea-gulls crying.

I must go down to the seas again, to the vagrant gypsy life,
To the gull's way and the whale's way, where the wind's like a whetted knife;
And all I ask is a merry yarn from a laughing fellow-rover,
And quiet sleep and a sweet dream when the long trick's over.


Back Tomorrow
Sue

23 comments:

  1. Love that poem. Had to learn it at school, and it was the rhythm in it (the boat rocking) that made it easy to learn.

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    1. We didn't learn this, but Cargoes featured in a radio programme we listened to at primary.

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  2. Love Sea Fever by John Masefield. I remember as a child at my small private school we always put on a show at the end of the summer term, more than a speech day, more a performance of some kind. And for one, as I had singing lessons, I sang Masefield's poem (set to music) Cargoes, which is another favourite of mine.
    Even on a dull day the sea front, and looking out to sea, is calming and inspiring.
    By the way, Sue, the book The Button Box which you reviewed a little while ago and which inspired me to order it from Amazon, arrived this morning and what an attractive book it is. Oh, I'm so looking forward to reading it (and also the wonderful book Robert Kime, about this designer's life and work, and a book on the rebuilding of London after the Great Fire - this year it's the 350th anniversary of that awful event.) Current reading: Kate Atkinson's Behind the Scenes at the Museum, published about 20 years ago! It's been on my bookshelf, then, for 20 years as I bought it when it was published, so why have I not read it until now? No idea! It's wonderful!!!
    Margaret P

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    1. 'Cargoes' with photos is coming soon!
      I've not read any Kate Atkinson at all - another gap in my knowledge

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    2. This is the only one I've read, Sue, and it's a cracker!
      The Button Box is great - been reading that in bed this morning, it prevented me from getting on with my work, always the sign or a good book! I love reading this kind of social history: choosing an artefact - in this case buttons - and through it demonstrating how life has changed. My memories go back to the very late 1940s, so I can relate to a lot of what is in this book. It's a super read.
      Margaret P

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  3. Grey skies but still looks good. I remember the Brighton folk were all out by their billion poind beach-huts on New Years day, having barbecues

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  4. One of my favourite poems which I was introduced to as a child. Your first photo reminded me of Brightlingsea, especially with the Martello Tower in the distance.

    Have an enjoyable weekend and I hope you get back to the hut again.

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  5. What a lovely place to be able to retreat to when you can. I could quite happily snuggle up in one of those huts for the day reading and knitting and just watching the world go by. xx

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  6. Oh and the plaintive cry of the seagull....I am child again!

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  7. Thanks for the wonderful memories of home! I miss Felixstowe. It sounds really silly, but I do. Can't wait until later in the summer when I can visit. I can't wait to see all the work they've done on the gardens. Mum and I usually eat our fish & chips sitting up there.

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    1. I walked through the new gardens around the Spa on Friday they are looking very new and tidy.

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  8. Used to think of the Masefield poem and cry when I was living on the prairies 1000s of miles from the sea. I love, love, love the Suffolk coast in all its moods.

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  9. The beach is a good place to be. Thanks for sharing your photos and the poem which I'd not heard before. I do miss Felixstowe, my other home! Sigh!

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    1. Is there a way to get a copy of the map on your header? I really like it! Thanks!

      https://grandmabeckyl.blogspot.com

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    2. I just googled Suffolk maps and found this. I'm not sure I should be using it really it's probably copyrighted! but it has the artists name on so I hope I'm OK. It's from an old postcard. many years ago when I collected postcards I had several similar from all parts of the country

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    3. Thanks! Maybe I have a postcard like this in all my items from England from way back when I was there in 1976-78. I'll have to look, who knows at it does look familiar.

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  10. That poem brings back school memories.
    xx

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  11. Nice pics (nice camera). Sometimes just going to the water soothes the soul.

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  12. My Dad used to sing that poem. It brought back lovely memories. x

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  13. Kate Atkinson is great, you should remedy that gap, Sue. We are currently in the car listening to Treasure Island on the way back from a day at the beach at Llandudno. Arghhh, Jim Lad we'll be talking pirate all week! I needed to do a trial visit as I'm bringing around 200 year 8 students for a day out in a couple of weeks. I must be mad!

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    1. 200!! What fun you will have losing that lot!

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  14. Beautiful poem. I actually prefer the seaside when it is like that, I've no one around, so much more peaceful xxx

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