Thursday, 19 May 2016

All I Do Is Read

All I do is Read
This ought to be the title of my blog.

We are waiting for Col to go in for the 6th chemo session. Once that's done he will be ready for the last, final and nastiest bit of the treatment for NHL. In the meantime he is having a echo-cardiograph and lung function test. The CT scan showed the blood clot in the lung had gone, one piece of good news.
The weather hasn't been good enough to go to the beach hut, the house is tidy, washing and ironing up to date and the grass cut, so I'm reading

Here are  two books read in the last few days. First,  A presumption of Death by Jill Paton Walsh and Dorothy L Sayers
CoverWhen she died Dorothy L Sayers left some letters describing what her hero - the amateur detective Lord Peter Wimsey - might have done during the war. Jill Paton Walsh used these letters as the basis for this novel.  Although I've not read any of the original Sayers books (why?) I enjoyed this. A well written story.

Second The Shepherds Life by James Rebanks.

Cover Flagged up as 'The surprise Hit of the Year' this is a lovely book about what life is like for a third generation sheep farmer on the fells of Cumbria. James Rebanks was a failure at school - he just wanted to be out with the sheep and his Grandad. Several years later he discovers that he is actually clever enough to go to university and sets his sights on Oxford.
Now, as well as being a prize winning sheep farmer he works for the World Heritage Sites part of UNESCO.
The farming year from shearing to lambing and through harsh winters is told from the point of view of someone who has always loved the area and always knew he had to keep farming the Herdwick sheep that are specially bred for the landscape.





A welcome to someone over in the Google followers, not sure who, maybe Jules? Thank you for clicking the button. 

I picked up more books from the library yesterday, so better keep reading.

Back in a day or 3
Sue

18 comments:

  1. I loved the original wimseys. Must check out this JPW/DLS one [I have read Thrones & Dominations, the other collaborative piece]

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I've requested Thrones,Dominations from the library but it may be a while because there is only one copy in the county, that's on a mobile so not due back until July and there are 3 people wanting it ahead of me - perhaps by Autumn!

      Delete
  2. Thank you for yet another bookish post - you can't go wrong with a bookish post for me!
    Dorothy L Sayers lived next door to my husband's aunt & uncle in Witham, Essex. My husband's cousin said that they used to see her, as children, on her motorbike.
    Margaret P

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sounds like she was quite a character

      Delete
  3. The Shepherd's Life sounds like my kind of book. And there's nothing wrong with reading .... as long as you blog about it ;-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'll keep reading and blogging then

      Delete
  4. I will have to try the DLS/JPW book. I do love the original Sayers and so I probably wouldn't have thought about trying it but if you recommend it Sue I just might give it a go.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. There is a awful lot of cross over with what you and I read so I probably will!

      Delete
  5. Only yesterday I downloaded The Shepherd's Life on to my Kindle, and am about to start it! I've had it on my "to read" list for a while.
    Have you read Running for the Hills by Horatio Clare? I mean to reread that - about a family who relocate from London to a Welsh hill farm. Loved it.
    Very different books I'm sure.
    I love sheep - grew up with them, during school holidays at least, when I stayed with my grandparents.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yep, I've read Running for the Hills,(it's in a box somewhere!)a while ago now. Shepherds Life is very down to earth and real.

      Delete
  6. I'll add my encouragement to you to keep reading and reviewing books for us.
    I have just reserved "The Shepherd's Life" on our mobile library website. Isn't technology clever, when it works! On the basis of your having Running for the Hills, which Mary in Bath recommended, "in a box
    somewhere", I've also reserved that assuming that to have made the cut when you sorted though your library it must be good. Sue

    ReplyDelete
  7. So exciting if you've never read Dorothy Sayers before and get to read them for the first time! I have a soft spot for 1930s detective fiction like Sayers, Margery Allingham (who also lived not far from us), Edmund Crispin and Ngaio Marsh.

    ReplyDelete
  8. So exciting if you've never read Dorothy Sayers before and get to read them for the first time! I have a soft spot for 1930s detective fiction like Sayers, Margery Allingham (who also lived not far from us), Edmund Crispin and Ngaio Marsh.

    ReplyDelete
  9. I'm so glad chemo is almost over, the effects build in your body, keeping you feeling worse than you need to. Reading is good, I have just joined a reading group at work.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Unfortunately the Last and nastiest part of treatment involves a huge chemo dose after stem cell removal which will put him in hospital for 4 weeks before recovering and having stem cells replaced.

      Delete
  10. Don't feel guilty to just sit down and read! I intend to do that this weekend when we are at our local Fleamarket, selling (hopefully!) I have earmarked the Shepherd's Life book so hope to find it in our travelling library sometime.

    ReplyDelete
  11. I hope you are both well...and reading is food for the soul....

    ReplyDelete