Wednesday, 3 February 2016

741.6092

741.6092 is the Dewey Decimal number of the book I've just finished but  it's wrong because 741 is the classification number for drawing and although this book is by a lady who is a fabric designer and illustrator it's actually a memoir of her very strange upbringing in Vermont during the 1970s. I have no idea where I heard about it, perhaps on someones blog? but the library had a copy.
 The author is Heather Ross and it's called 'How to Catch a Frog and other stories of family, love, dysfunction, survival and DIY'. It was an enjoyable read about a two sisters growing up in the country, how their life was shaped by poverty and the mother who couldn't cope, letting them run wild to swim and play. Funny but sad with some craft  and DIY ideas thrown in.Worth a read. But I think it should be in the biographies at 920ROS to make it more accessible.

 Yesterday we went to hospital for Col's pre-chemo blood test which will happen before each session of chemotherapy. We also saw the MacMillan nurse who advises about benefits and she said depending on how poorly Col is as the sessions progress will determine if we can get a benefit called PIP and if he is unwell then I will also be able to claim carers benefit. That's as well as the £73 a week support allowance. None of these are means tested.

I feel really embarrassed  about comments and  bad about making Sheila cry when reading yesterdays post. We are quite matter of fact about the whole cancer thing because of the amount of cancer in both our families, the diagnoses was a relief and not a surprise because it meant treatment would start.And I always have my hair short, so no sacrifice necessary! Regarding our daughter's ovarian cancer at age 18. It was spotted and treated very quickly, we hardly had time to worry, after surgery she had chemo but only as a just-in-case measure. It was an unusual type of cancer and as she was so young  had all the junior doctors in to see her, making notes for their studies. Her case was also written up for a medical journal. Although she lost some hair she was never ill before or after the treatment and had very few days off work. She will be 29 this November and is fit and well.

Many thanks for all the supportive comments

Back tomorrow.........probably
Sue

29 comments:

  1. Oh Sue....you mustn't feel bad about making me cry. It just makes my heart ache that such hard working lovely people should have to go through what you are going through. My son and daughter both work in a prison and have to deal with some unbelievable scumbags who deserve nasty things to happen to them and I just let it get to me yesterday.
    Hugs for you both-x-

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  2. The book looks interesting.
    I have had cancer, I know what you have been, and will be going through. The loss of hair was my hardest as I had waist length hair. It grew back - finer, and not as far as my waist either.
    Julie xxxxxxx

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  3. Sue, it pleases me to hear you speak as you do about the whole thing. My mother's sister had bladder cancer many years ago and had to have an irreversible ileostomy, which she coped with marvellously. She was often called back to hospital to speak to patients who were devastated at their diagnosis.
    In fact she lived for another twenty years and died in old age of a stroke. The 'c' word used to be spoken of in hushed tones. Thank goodness it is now in the open and you sound to be coping with it well. I salute you both.

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  4. It also pleases me to hear you speak as you do. Only because it makes it easier for me to comment! I don't want to cross the road to avoid you because I don't know what to say. I was worried my comment was too glib and would offend some people but I think you know the love and encouragement behind the comment xx

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  6. I seem to spend a lot of time being teary and emotional these days I don't know why I'm not miserable or unhappy but everything sets me off it doesn't help my face lol. You show great strength and resilience.

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  7. Please can you send me some of your "matter of fact" outlook? I wish I could adopt something similar, I tend to over think things and and up worrying about unimportant stuff! A good example is my first ever routine mammogram that'll be coming soon. I'm 52 this year and have never been called yet. I daren't go for it in case it's not good news! Ridiculous isn't it!

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    1. Routine mammograms are fine - don't worry, it's a bit squishy! but over very soon. The nurses who do mammograms are all lovely and then a couple of weeks later you get a letter saying everything is OK and that's it!

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    2. Mrs L H,

      I hope Sue won't mind but I used to go regularly for the 'routine' mammograms. I had two which were clear and then on my third I was re-called. I knew this was bad news, and it turned out I had a stage 3 cancer. But that was eleven years ago! Do go for mammograms - I'm only alive today because I went for my mammograms. My cancer was the more aggressive non-hormonal type, the cancer that is called HER2+ cancer. But as I say, that was eleven years ago. You go for your mammogram. It can be a life-saver. It hurts a little bit, boobs been squished, but they have to flatten them to get a good X-ray result. But it is only momentary, and to detect cancer or not, it's worth it.
      Margaret P

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    3. it's a ... 22 ... 23 ... moment of discomfort and SO worth it. I had breast cancer in 2000. Caught early and treated simply - thanks to a mammogram.

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    4. Two very brave ladies. I'm happy that you've both had positive outcomes. That little voice inside is now urging me to accept the forthcoming invitation.

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    5. Yes, Mrs L H, do it! If you have it, then something can be done about it; if you haven't, you will be able to relax.
      Margaret P

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  8. I worked in a large secondary school library for 2 years and remember the Dewey system well. I also recall ringing a parent regarding an overdue book. 'Lichtenstein' was 6 months overdue and desperately needed by other GCSE students. Mother had great pleasure in telling me her little darling didn't do German and I had even more pleasure in telling her it was Lichtenstein the 'pop artist' not Lichtenstein the place in Germany. I knew by the Dewey reference! She conceded and her little darling brought it back the following day!
    I am similar to you with my matter of fact attitude but I've had to learn to be like that. Worrying is a total waste of time because it cannot change the outcome, it can only steal precious time you could be spending doing something worthwhile. To quote: Worrying doesn't take away tomorrows troubles. It takes away today's peace.

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  9. I'm so glad someone is giving you information about benefits. When I worked for the CAB I used to help people claim benefits when they were sick. I was debating about whether to say something or not but didn't want to 'poke my nose in'.

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  10. Don't feel embarrassed by comments or making folk teary it is just an outpouring of empathy from folks that love your blog, you and your family from afar.

    Your matter of factness is refreshing in this drama filled world, when every 'celebrity' and I use the word lightly, writes books and fills pages of gossipy magazines with the ins and outs of every minor medical 'catastrophe' that befalls them, even if it is just an ingrown toenail !!

    I read recently that 'worry takes away the space in your mind for imagination and hope', so it's best not to worry :-)

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  11. Catching up with two days' worth. Everyone has said pretty much what I would have said, so.........
    here are hugs coming your way!
    xxxxxxx

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  12. A friend of mine had ovarian cancer very young as well, she too recovered well and has had another child recently. My mum's cancer was treated only with surgery, again no problems. We were lucky.

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  13. Glad you are getting sorted. Interested to hear about the decimal system, I never knew how it worked! xx

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  14. really dont know what to say ...good luck with the pip its a godsend

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  15. Really pleased you are getting sorted and your positive outlook only helps make things easier. We already get pip but a tip when filling in the paperwork make sure you emphasis what Col's health is like on his worst days it does tell you to do this but it does help to keep reminding yourself whilst filling it in. Maybe we have missed something as though we claim carers allowance and pip we dont claim support allowance you mentioned I have never heard of it. xxxx

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    1. I think the support allowance is for under 65s? Its all jolly complicated

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  16. Really pleased you are getting sorted and your positive outlook only helps make things easier. We already get pip but a tip when filling in the paperwork make sure you emphasis what Col's health is like on his worst days it does tell you to do this but it does help to keep reminding yourself whilst filling it in. Maybe we have missed something as though we claim carers allowance and pip we dont claim support allowance you mentioned I have never heard of it. xxxx

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    1. I think this must be ESA or employment support allowance which replaced the old incapacity benefit. Sick pay in other words. It can be contribution based which is non-means tested or income based if you have low or no savings.

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  17. Love the idea of you cutting your hair too. I am always chopping on my hair to keep i shirt. Very was and go just what you need between new home and hospital.
    As you have said your positive outlook is what you have only helps make your life better.

    cheers, parsnip

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  18. You are very impressive. Hope you don't mind me saying x

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  19. A quite hand of encouragement on both your's and Col's shoulders....from our place to yours.

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  20. being positive is the only way to be at times like this when we were dealing with my dads prostrate cancer the year before last it was the being focused that got everyone through thankfully he is now in remission. best wishes to you both x

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  21. Cancer does not mean the end these days. I wish you good fortune.

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  22. Such a great outcome for your daughter. You do hear so many more positives these days, which is such great news. It's over fifteen years since I was diagnosed myself and I haven't had any problem since. The chemo isn't a very nice thing to go through, but it works and that's all that matters in the long run so tell Col to hang in there. Sending my best wishes to you both. Hugs. xx

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