Saturday, 25 June 2016

More steps on the way

This blog has always been a diary,  first for the self-sufficient smallholding and campsite, then it charted Colin's un-expected heart problems and since January the 'coping with Mantle Cell Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma'  story has unfolded. I've shared details because that's what's happening and maybe someone reading might have to go through the same thing one day and it's always useful to have a bit of information.

Col  has now  been through six lots of chemotherapy with all the problems and side effects and next we have the final and biggest hurdle to jump over.
A special chemotherapy, 9 days of injections to force the stem cells to overflow from the bone marrow into the blood, stem cell harvest (collection), six days of high dose chemo, recovery, stem cell replacement and more recovery which includes up to 4 weeks in hospital in partial isolation. The aim is for remission for as long as possible - maybe up to 7 years - maybe less. There is a risk with stem cell treatment - 5% of people will have problems, some serious. There is no complete cure for this type of cancer.

 So on Thursday it started and we went to Addenbrookes hospital where the stem cells will be collected, over one or two days in July, to have everything explained, see where it will happen and for signing consent forms. Addenbrookes is on the edge of Cambridge and thankfully, now that we are in Ipswich it is easy to get to along the A14 and A11- just under an hour and a half away. Colin made me drive there and back to see how I would cope with the busy road. We used the Park and Ride at Babraham which is not far from Addenbrookes  and saved us trying to find a parking place at the hospital. When we go for the actual stem cell collection we will have to be there very early so should be able to park on their multi-storey car park on site. Thankfully all the other treatment can take place in Ipswich.

On Friday he had a CT scan to check there are no other visible problems, he has already had several blood tests and a lung function test, all to make sure he is as well as possible and fit enough to cope with everything that will be thrown at him between now and the end of July.

 Monday I will deliver him to hospital for 5 hours for the first thing on the list above - he will be prepared for chemo, the chemo itself and then flushing afterwards.Then the injections will start, (we've learned how to mix up the dose and how to safely inject himself) which will give him flu-like symptoms - lovely!

So on we go, one step at a time towards a recovery - roll on Christmas!

Back Soon
Sue




43 comments:

  1. It is good to read this straightforward account of what you will both have to endure.. It puts my own difficulties into perspective when I read what you're going through.

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  2. You are a geat team and that's what helping you to cope, I'm sure. Good luck to you both as this next treatment starts and hopefully you will have some visits from your beautiful grandson. Catriona

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  3. Thanks for sharing all this information and what you and Col are going through. It has been particularly helpful for me as my brother has recently been diagnosed with Myeloma and at the present time is waiting to have his stem cells replaced. He like Col has had a few setbacks along the way, but at the present time is doing well. Thanks again and best wishes to you both. Belated congratulations on the birth of your new grandson - he is a little beauty!. Chris.

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    1. Hi there, where is your brother being treated.? I am an11 year multiple myeloma survivor. If I can help with questions,you can click on byname it'll take youth my blog. Best your husband within SCT.

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    2. Hang in there, you're getting near the ens if the treatment now.

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  4. I am wishing you both a postive outcome from all this

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  5. Good luck for Monday another step along his road, it is a very stressful time, but soon he should see the benefits and start to recover. Chemo real does suck. As for your blog, I have reread my blog over my treatment time, it's interesting to look back.

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  6. My thoughts and prayers are with you both.

    Easy does it. One day at a time...

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  7. When I did the neupogen shots for stem cell collection I was lucky not to have aloof bone pain. That can be the #1 thing that happens as the they cells are really multiplying. When I did the stem cell retrieval, I was
    lucky to get enough in one day. Good Luck, it is quite a process and one I hope I never have to go thru again. BTW, I had remission for 4 years, so it was worth it.

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  8. I think your very matter-of-fact approach to what is a huge life incident is what I admire most. I wish Col (and you) all positive thoughts for the forthcoming treatment.

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  9. My thoughts are with you both. You could not be in a better place than Addenbrookes. I look forward to hearing good news as you move forward.

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  10. Wishing you both all the very best - I'll be thinking of you.

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  11. Hope everything goes well on Monday. As they say, one day at a time, but it would be nice if it was Christmas time for you!

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  12. Hi Sue,
    I don't follow you as such but I do read your blog every day. You are a true inspiration ..... you handle everything in your stride with such calmness. My best wishes are with you and Col ... what a trooper.
    Les xx

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  13. The two of you are going through so much, and I admire your attitude. As Les has said, you really are inspiring.
    Much love to both of you. xx

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  14. Fingers crossed and tozies plaited for you both. Its a horrible disease and one of the ones that claimed my Dad. It is good to read your no-nonsense practical approach to everything and being so supportive of each other in the process. with best wishes to you both.

    Pattypanxx

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  15. Sue - David has just been reading this with me and we both of us wish Col all the luck in the world. What a blessing that you got moved into Ipswich before this time. Love to you both.

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  16. Such admiration for you both,my thoughts and best wishes Jill

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  17. My fingers are crossed.
    xx

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  18. My family's thoughts and prayers have been with you both throughout, and we're crossing fingers all goes as well as possible during this last, scary bit. Have you made any plans to keep yourself busy (or at least distracted) during Col's month of partial isolation? I've a list of book titles if you're interested, but you might want to get out and about a little more as those weeks move on. Best wishes to you both.

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  19. Good luck. It all sounds scary and you handling it so well.

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  20. I can't imagine how you deal with this apart from one day at a time. All best wishes to both of you.x

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  21. our church has been praying for you through all this and will continue to do so for as long as is necessary. You both seem to have a positive attitude and I believe that is half the battle.

    Pat

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  22. Our very best wishes to you both for a positive outcome and good health at the end of it. XXXXX

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  23. Very best wishes to you both as you manage this 'next stage'. Your positive attitude and strength is amazing, a true inspiration. X

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  24. Oh Sue, you are both going through so much I really feel for you. I will think of you both lots of times on Monday I'm sure everything will go well. Jane xx

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  25. Oh Sue, you are both going through so much I really feel for you. I will think of you both lots of times on Monday I'm sure everything will go well. Jane xx

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  26. Keep at it, his and your strength are enviable

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  27. sending prayers for you both in the next step you are facing. Hugs..

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  28. I've been following along for awhile; i've not been able to comment for some reason. (I'm computer illiterate for a lot of things..) But, i'm trying again. I just wanted to add my heartfelt good wishes, thoughts and prayers. Cancer is tough, but i feel that the two of you are tougher. All the best!

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  29. Words fail me here...
    You are in my thoughts and prayers. I do hope that knowledge brings you some comfort. You both sound so very brave!
    Love and prayers from "the other side of the pond".
    B

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  30. Oh, Sue, what can I say? This is such a lot for you both to get through together. Of course, like all your other blog friends I will be thinking of you both, and, as we Quakers say, holding you in the light.
    You have a lot of courage. xx

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  31. So glad Col has access to all the best treatment. You are strong to go through all this with him.

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  32. All the best i hope everything goes well , Take care xxx

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  33. Sending best wishes to you both in the next part of Col's treatment. May it go as smoothly as it can Yes all the best xx

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  34. What a lot you're both having to cope with.......and how well you're managing it!
    My very best wishes to Col for his forthcoming treatment, and to you for being so strong about everything.

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  35. I will be thinking of you both through all of this and sending healing thoughts-x-

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  36. Thinking of you both. Your attitude to dealing with everything has been amazing and inspirational. X

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  37. All my very best wishes to you and your hubby. I hope he starts to mend soon.

    Jean
    x

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  38. Although I of course would never wish this on anyone I am so glad that things are going well and that the treatment is progressing to the next stage. I hope that all will be well and will be continuing to send the good wishes that I often send your way even if you don't know it!

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